Frequently Asked Questions

Town Hall office hours vary by department and are as follows:

Tax Collector and Town Clerk: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday9 AM – 4 PM; Wednesday 12 PM – 7 PM

Code Enforcement Office: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 9 AM – 4 PM; Wednesday 1 PM – 8 PM

Electrical Inspector: Wednesday 6 PM – 8 PM and by appointment.

Treasurer:
Monday – Thursday 7 AM – 3 PM; (closed on Friday)

Selectmen’s Clerk:
Monday – Friday  9 AM – 4 PM

Assessor:
Monday – Friday  9 AM – 4 PM

Planning Board Clerk:
Wednesday, Thursday 9 AM – 11 AM

Tuesday: 8 AM – 12 PM
Thursday: 11 AM – 7 PM
Saturday: 8 AM – 4 PM
Sunday: 8 AM – 4 PM

Yes, citizens in the Town of Lyman (as well as most towns) are required to obtain a building permit for a shed. This is for confirming set backs, as well as for verify that it is a comforming structure.

You do NOT need a permit to put up a fence, BUT it is imperative that the fence be placed on your own property. If there are questions regarding property lines, having a current deed or survey can help with that. It is also important to consider enough space for maintenance on your neighbor’s side as well, as being a considerate neighbor and staying on your own property for upkeep helps to keep neighbors “neighborly”!

Assessor’s FAQs

The annual budget is set by way of Town Meeting which occurs in June of each year. The tax rate is calculated by dividing the approved budget amount, including school and county costs, by the town’s total assessed property value, which is determined by the assessor after the yearly property review is done in the spring and summer of each year.
Your tax assessed value is an opinion that was based on the market as it existed at the time of the last revaluation which was completed in 2007. In 2008 the market started to slide downwards and appears to have leveled off between 2010 and 2011. While appraisals are opinions for individual properties based on a specific date and time and for a specific purpose (refinancing, estate planning, etc), tax assessment is based on the mass-appraisal method which deals with averages of sales in specific areas in a specific time period. Currently, we are assessing at 100% of market value.
A mortgage appraisal is an opinion of value. You probably paid for it, but it wasn’t done for you, it was done for the lending institution. Its purpose is to assess risk. In a normal market, it is not unusual to see mortgage appraisals anywhere from 10% to 20% less than assessed value, so in a stressed market, we expect to see ultra-conservative appraisals. I like to review the appraisal to make sure that the basic data agrees with what we have on file. I also pay close attention to the comparable sales used in the appraisal. At that point, I have already checked our records to see if our information is correct and will then meet with you to discuss the issue.